Menu

The mega birth post

Where were we? Oh yes: pre-eclampsia. The causes of this condition aren’t well-understood; the management of it is. Shortly after my last post on the subject, the midwives and obstetricians at the Rosie Hospital in Cambridge started to manage Nessa’s pregnancy more closely, and we found ourselves in and out of hospital every couple of…

Where were we? Oh yes: pre-eclampsia. The causes of this condition aren’t well-understood; the management of it is. Shortly after my last post on the subject, the midwives and obstetricians at the Rosie Hospital in Cambridge started to manage Nessa’s pregnancy more closely, and we found ourselves in and out of hospital every couple of days. By Maundy Thursday they’d decided to admit her, and because her blood pressure had continued to rise, on Easter Sunday they decided to induce the baby.

He didn’t want to come and so after a very uncomfortable night for Nessa, a caesarian section was booked for the afternoon of Monday 13 April. I’m not going to scare anyone with tales of the management of pre-eclampsia; nor of how unpleasant a c-section is, but after 20 minutes of hard work, Daniel Benjamin Isaac Marlow was born at 4:38pm, weighing 5lbs 14.5oz. He was taken to the Lady Mary ward first, and then transferred to the Special Care Baby Unit as his oxygen saturation was too low. Meanwhile, Nessa was transferred back into the delivery unit where she had to stay for 24 hours after the birth. Being separated from Danny for all this time was horrible; I tried to fill it by running between the two of them with my digital camera but it wasn’t a good substitute.

dannybw-001

Eventually, Nessa was moved onto Lady Sara ward, which is adjacent to SCBU, and could visit him at any time. He was still a tangle of wires and tubes at this point – oxygen through his nose; a canula and glucose drip into his arm; a pulse and O2 saturation sensor on his toe, and a feeding tube up his nose. But by the third day, he’d had some “kangaroo care” or skin-skin contact with Nessa.

danielday3-001

danielday3-003

This was a surreal time for us. The first few days were absolutely horrible; it was very difficult to hold our baby; he was fed hourly through a tube on a 24-hour cycle and day blurred into night. He was four weeks early and being delivered via c-section meant that the fluids hadn’t been squeezed from his lungs. All the while, the medical staff attempted to eliminate other causes for his low oxygen saturation – lumbar punctures to detect infection; chest xrays; ultrasound. But every day he got a bit stronger and a little less dependent on the external support.

dannyday6-002

Still, it was nearly two weeks before he could come home and almost three weeks until he met his older brother and sister.

wk3-006

Douglas Adams compared a child’s early development to a computer booting up, and this is what we see with Danny. His awareness of what’s around him gets wider each day.

dannywk7-002

Working out how old he is, is also difficult and even confuses the medical staff. A GP was concerned that he’d not started smiling by six weeks old; the hospital confirmed that these development checkpoints in the first year can all have four weeks added on to account for his prematurity. Still, no problem with smiling now.

july09-01

He’s now doubled his birthweight and it’s interesting to compare him to his cousin, Charlie, who was only a week old at the time this photo was taken.

july09-11

He’s becoming a lot more aware of his own body and has started to grab for his knees and his toes with his fingers.

july09-04

He’s also become a lot more facially-expressive.

july09-29

camoflage-01

So Danny’s now nearly four months old and we’re well into the routine of having a young baby in the house. Time to go and sterlise the breast pump!

camoflage-02

Comments

Liz

Liz

Hi. I am a nursing student and am making a poster for a neonatal intensive care unit on kangaroo care. I think that is very good picture of kangaroo care. Would it be okay for me to use this photo for the poster?

Thank you!

reply

admin

admin

@Lucia
Thanks!

reply

admin

admin

@Linz
A zebra, which Luke made for him!

reply

Michael

Michael

Hey – I remember you! 😛

Holly was a C-section too, although thankfully without all the extra drama that has accompanied Danny’s first months. Mind you, Steph wound up with a serious post-op infection which caused a bit of drama of its own.

I’m just happy that all seems to be getting sorted. I miss a lot of the joy of watching a baby discover the world, although I certainly don’t miss the diapers or feeding schedules.

And thanks for putting the context around these pics that have been showing up on Flickr. I hope that you all continue to enjoy all of the joys of life together.

reply

Lucia

Lucia

Came here via Cheerful One. Daniel is beautiful; congratulations to you all.

reply

Linz

Linz

You really do help produce lovely children, you know! Danny is looking bright and beautiful and I’m glad you and Nessa are enjoying him. Oh, and what on earth has he got on his head? A fish? A zebra? A zebrafish?

reply

Chris Mortimer

Chris Mortimer

Great page, I can see your smile in him. He looks a bonny little chap, not sure the pants will fit him yet but give him a month or two 🙂

reply

Keir

Keir

As you can imagine, the later stages of this post are sounding very familiar. I’m glad we didn’t have to go through the initial stages the way you did, though. Danny’s looking great now!

reply

Alison T

Alison T

Absolutely beautiful 🙂

reply

Leave A Comment

Comments support plain text only.

Your email address will not be published.